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JUL/AUG 2013  

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White papers

Tronics Group

tronics GYPRO2300 Gyroscopes are some of the most complex handheld sensing instruments built by mankind. Its history goes back two centuries with the introduction of the “Machine of Bohnenberger,” a gyroscope made with a massive sphere rotating with the aid of three pivoted supports, and continues with today’s MEMs high performance versions.

Counterfeit products are a multi-million dollar illegal business that inserts imitations and phony products into a vulnerable supply chain, but an international group has developed some tools and suggestions to help companies avoid buying these sham products.Counterfeit products are a multi-million dollar illegal business that inserts imitations and phony products into a vulnerable supply chain. An international group has developed some tools and suggestions to help companies avoid buying these fake goods.

Proto Labs white paper

Developing a prototype quickly so that it can be fit-and-function tested can reduce the time it takes to get a product to market. “Prototype models help design teams make better informed decisions by obtaining invaluable data from the performance of, and reaction to, the prototypes,” according to a white paper on the subject from Proto Labs called, "Prototyping Process: Choosing the Best Process for Your Project."

ALine Inc.

ALine whitepaperSuccessful microfluidic products integrate robust components capable of complex functions while being tolerant to a range of conditions. This paper discusses the integration of multiple micro-fabrication techniques to create a completely functional Lab-on-a-chip product.

The proceedings from the recently concluded International Conference on MicroManufacturing 2013 in Victoria, BC, Canada, are now available at the University of Wisconsin’s “Minds @ UW” Web site.

Researchers at MIT and the Santa Fe Institute have found that some widely used formulas for predicting how rapidly technology will advance—notably, Moore’s Law and Wright’s Law—offer superior approximations of the pace of technological progress.

Wireless communication standards have allowed sensors to develop from traditional forms—those that require the active involvement of the patient in collecting data, transmitting it, or both—to passive forms that do not need patient participation. The most fully passive sensors can provide constant monitoring of a person's vital signs or other measures, and store that data or send it wirelessly to a care team.

Newport XYZUsing a Newport motorized XYZ sub-system, combined with an ultrafast laser, allows for an edge comparable to using a high-throughput tool in micromachining 

Mold Craft 1Molding a pipette-shaped part with 0.370"-long wall section that is 0.015" thick followed by a 0.080"-long section with a wall that narrows to 0.008" thick is challenging by most molding standards. Add to that, molding these microparts from PEEK, and the challenge is greater. Now, how about doing this in a four- or eight-cavity mold? Can a Cpk of 1.33 be achieved on this wall section? These are the challenges and questions Mold Craft set out to address when a customer can to them with this medical “funnel tip” component.

If you’ve never seen a 30µm thick drill, don’t worry—you can’t see one without a magnifying glass. The size of half the thickness of a human hair is the scale the company W Präzisionstechnik works on. Its high-precision five-axis milling machines produce the tiniest components with accuracy using tool laser-based measuring systems from Blum-Novotest.

EOS of North America Inc.

EOS GmbH, Munich, Germany, offers an overview of the complex parts now possible using its micro laser-sintering (MLS) technology, a key component of the company's "e-Manufacturing" process.

French researchers recently released a white paper that describes their “design-for-manufacture” (DFM) method of optimizing the design of parts made by additive and subtractive techniques. The authors propose a method by which a one-piece CAD model of a part can be separated into modules—like pieces of a 3-D puzzle. Users can then determine which part features would be best to produce by additive and subtractive methods.